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Learning to Learn
If at first you don't succeed, try and try again.   I remember hearing these words often when I was a kid. My parents, although incredibly hard on me and always pushing me to be the best and most...
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Learning to Learn

Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 12:11pm

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If at first you don't succeed, try and try again.  

I remember hearing these words often when I was a kid. My parents, although incredibly hard on me and always pushing me to be the best and most successful version of myself, always made sure I knew that perfection was impossible. In fact, when I came home with an ACT score that was far lower than I had anticipated, my parents told me it was beneficial for my resume to have a few imperfections. Something about showing I was a real person and not a mechanically designed robot scholar.  

In life, I have always tried to remember my parent's lessons that perfection was simply not possible. Sure, we try our best at what we do, but when the plan in our pretty heads doesn’t exactly work out well on paper, we have to keep our chins up and charge at what feels like the impossibly large mountain in front of us. So this past week, when I hosted my first intern event for the Orrville Area Chamber of Commerce, I had to keep my chin up and charge that mountain, even when I thought everything was just going downhill.  

Often times, we are our own worst critics. We critique and pull ourselves apart or downgrade our accomplishments, because the plan in our heads didn’t go as we had planned. But more than not, people on the outside think we do just fine, great even. I came home from my first event feeling discouraged and unsure of myself. Was I meant to do this job? Was I failing already? But shortly after I had picked my brain a few half dozen times, a simple text message from a friend that had attended my event reaffirmed my faith in myself and my abilities, and encouraged me to continue on in my work.  

As young professionals, we constantly feel the need to prove ourselves. To outshine others and to continuously improve our own work. But sometimes, it's okay to not do as well as we had hoped, or to even fail. Failure keeps us humble, and inspires us to always try and try again. So make mistakes! Mess up just a little bit. I promise, it's okay! Internships and entry level jobs are designed for learning, so give yourself something to learn from! At the end of the day, it might just be the best lesson you could ever have. 

Inside the Boardroom
After what feels like a whirlwind of a week, full of countless email chains, meetings and events to attend, as well as a never-ending stream of coffee, I finally have the chance to sit at my desk for...
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Inside the Boardroom

Posted on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 2:38pm

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After what feels like a whirlwind of a week, full of countless email chains, meetings and events to attend, as well as a never-ending stream of coffee, I finally have the chance to sit at my desk for more than thirty minutes and work on another post for my summer intern series here at the Orrville Area Chamber of Commerce. And while this past week has been tiring at times, I have made an overwhelming amount of memories. The most prominent to me, although minimal to others, was attending my first executive board meeting.  

Growing up, I always knew I was little different than most girls my age. While my friends strived to be teachers and nurses, both rewarding and exceptional careers, I craved a much different atmosphere; the boardroom. I didn’t want to just sit at my desk and go through the basic and often mundane tasks of a classic 9-5 job, but rather I craved the hustle and bustle of the business world. I wanted to wake up before the sun just to spend an hour checking my emails, and to thrive off espresso and pure adrenalin.  

When I interned in New York City, I got a small taste of the corporate lifestyle. I rode the subway with some of the most powerful and influential people in the Financial District, and had the chance to meet and interact with big names throughout the city. Going into the internship, I knew this would offer a countless number of benefits and advantages to my experiences. However, I did not realize it could also be a disadvantage. Due to the nature of the people I was working with and the business conducted, interns were not always allowed into meetings. Sure, big group meetings and presentations, we were more than welcome to attend. But executive branch meetings, finance committee meeting, and other senior level meetings were behind closed doors, and for obvious reasons, often took place without interns.  

As I mentioned in my previous post, I have been invited to and in attendance to almost all meetings that have taken place at the chamber since my internship began at the beginning of May. Naturally I have been excited to be involved in any and all meetings I've had the privilege to attend, but nothing quite hit the spot like an invitation to the monthly executive board meeting.  

I arrived at the office just a few minutes before 7a.m. to find our conference room near full, something I had never seen before. When I walked inside, I could feel the air change and my temperature rise, as I began to mingle with the board members, often some of the most senior members of their own corporations and businesses. Meeting agendas were passed out, introductions were made, and business was conducted with little to no regard for my ultimate fan girl moment that was happening right in front of everyone's eyes. Little did they all realize, the inside of a conference room and a seat at the actual meeting table was a goal I had set for myself long ago. Sure, it have just been an executive board meeting of the local chamber of commerce, and no we weren't dealing with the work of Fortune-500 CEOS, but it was the beginning of an uphill climb I had chased for years in my college career.  

What exactly does a Machine Operator Do?
What Does a Machine Operator Do?
MACHINISTS are in demand at several Orrville Area manufacturing facilities.  View Jobs    What exactly does a Machinist do?   Machinists use machine tools, such as lathes, milling...
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What Does a Machine Operator Do?

What exactly does a Machine Operator Do?

Posted on Friday, May 26, 2017 - 2:26pm

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MACHINISTS are in demand at several Orrville Area manufacturing facilities.  View Jobs 

 

What exactly does a Machinist do?

 

Machinists use machine tools, such as lathes, milling machines, and grinders, to produce precision metal parts. Many machinists must be able to use both manual and CNC machinery. CNC machines control the cutting tool speed and do all necessary cuts to create a part.

 

Department of Labor provides a complete overview of Machinists and Tool and Die Makers