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Romich Honored at Maker Monday
Romich Honored at Maker Monday
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 9:36am
Schantz MakerSpace began Maker Mondays in May of 2015 as a way for community makers, inventors and tinkerers to get together and collaborate on...
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Romich Honored at Maker Monday

Romich Honored at Maker Monday

Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 9:36am

Schantz MakerSpace began Maker Mondays in May of 2015 as a way for community makers, inventors and tinkerers to get together and collaborate on imaginative projects. The group meets on the third Monday of each month at Schantz Organ Company in Orrville and has grown to over 35 attendees.

 

The January 16th meeting showcased the progress of a CNC Machine Build class where students are learning the process of constructing a desktop CNC router. At the end of the four-week class, students will take home a fully functional machine that they made with their own hands. The students will also receive introductory sessions on the software used to operate the machine.

 

Several volunteers and Maker Monday contributors came together to make this class possible and additional classes are currently being developed for the spring season.

 

During the meeting, one such contributor received a special honor. Ohio Representative Ron Amstutz was on-hand to present Barry Romich, co-founder of the Prentke Romich Company, with a certificate from the Ohio Legistlature congratulating his company on its 50th anniversary.

 

The Prentke Romich Company is known for its efforts to provide new technology and services to individuals with speech and language disabilities to help them become successful communicators.

 

They are the perfect example of makers finding ways to help improve people’s lives and a shining light in the maker community. There are makers like these out there in our community. The hope of Maker Mondays is to give such makers a place to get started and get inspired.

 

If you would like to take part in our discussion or learn more about what it means to be a maker, be sure to attend the next Maker Monday on February 20th, 2017. The meeting will be held from 7-9pm at Schantz Organ Company (626 S Walnut St, Orrville, OH 44667).

 

CNC Design to be featured at Maker Monday
Posted on Friday, January 6, 2017 - 11:45am
Schantz MakerSpace has announced the next Maker Monday event will take place on Monday, January 16th at Schantz Organ Company from 7:00-9:00pm. This...
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CNC Design to be featured at Maker Monday

Posted on Friday, January 6, 2017 - 11:45am

Schantz MakerSpace has announced the next Maker Monday event will take place on Monday, January 16th at Schantz Organ Company from 7:00-9:00pm.

This installment of Maker Monday will feature the completed desktop CNC router we have been working on over the last two months. Also, our CNC Machine build class is about halfway through the completion of their machines and students from the class will be on hand to share their experiences thus far. We have run several projects through the prototype machine in an effort to better learn the software, work with hold down devices and dust collection equipment, and develop new ideas to test the capabilities of the machine. We're excited about the possibilities!

In addition, we have a committee working on the NEXT class to come from Schantz MakerSpace, following the CNC class. The idea is to go farther with the learning experiences of 3-D printing. We have offered some basic introductory classes, and now we want to go further in utilizing the software to build more complex creations. If you are interested in learning more about 3-D printing in a more hands-on experience, be sure to attend.

Maker Mondays take place every third Monday of each month in the Schantz Organ Company assembly room from 7:00-9:00pm. Our community is full of makers with experience in many different kinds of mediums: including woodworking, 3-D printing, electronic programming, metalworking and much more. It is also full of people with great ideas for products or inventions, but don't have the means to bring their ideas to life. Maker Mondays are a chance to not only learn about what is going on at the Schantz MakerSpace, but also to meet all of these skilled people who share a desire to make things. We hope you will join us!

 

What is the Wayne County Maker Faire?
Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 - 12:52pm
They call it the Greatest Show (& Tell) on Earth. Maker Faire is part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new! As a...
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What is the Wayne County Maker Faire?

Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 - 12:52pm

They call it the Greatest Show (& Tell) on Earth. Maker Faire is part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new! As a celebration of the Maker Movement, it’s a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness. Faire gathers together tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, food artisans, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, artists, students, and commercial exhibitors. Makers come to show their creations and share their learnings. Attendees flock to Maker Faire to glimpse the future and find the inspiration to become Makers themselves.

 

The Wayne County Mini Maker Faire will be held at The University of Akron Wayne College, May 20, 2017

 

Learn more about the Maker Faire and how to participate here

 

VT Hackney Awarded Prototype Contract by USPS for NGDV
Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 - 10:35am
The United States Postal Service has provided notification that VT Hackney is one of a select group of companies awarded a prototype contract under...
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VT Hackney Awarded Prototype Contract by USPS for NGDV

Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 - 10:35am

The United States Postal Service has provided notification that VT Hackney is one of a select group of companies awarded a prototype contract under the Next Generation Delivery Vehicle (NGDV) Acquisition Program.

“I speak for everyone at VT Hackney in expressing our excitement in continuing the goal to develop and manufacture the next generation delivery vehicle for the most recognizable work truck in the world,” says General (Ret.) John Coburn, CEO of VT Systems, parent company to VT Hackney.

VT Hackney will partner exclusively with Workhorse Group Incorporated (NASDAQ: WKHS) on the contract to provide an advanced powertrain to meet the Postal Service’s wide range of delivery needs.  The solution targets savings to the USPS in reduced fuel expenses, substantially reducing the Postal Services maintenance costs, and strengthen their sustainability initiatives by providing a near-zero emission next generation delivery vehicle.

In preparation for the development, VT Hackney visited USPS locations and interviewed current and former USPS employees to design a purpose-built vehicle with a focus on the body attributes delivering a better work environment for the operators, while meeting the USPS cargo objectives.

“Our prototype proposal is built around the USPS goal to increase efficiencies in delivery,  providing a safer and more ergonomic vehicle for the operators, and reducing long term costs,” says Mike Tucker, President and CEO of VT Hackney.

VT Hackney has been in the vocational body business since 1946 with the Hackney and Kidron brands.  The company has built a solid reputation on high quality products designed to increase efficiency by improving body design.  Through its teaming agreement, Workhorse will be responsible for producing the E-Gen chassis.  Workhorse is a provider of electric vehicle drivetrain solutions focused primarily on work trucks requiring a higher gross vehicle weight rating.

“Combining the assets of VT Hackney along with Workhorse provides the USPS with a path to test advanced powertrain technologies within Postal Service operations and we are excited about this opportunity,” states Tucker.

 

 

Most wired hospital Aultman Orrville Hospital Orrville Ohio
Aultman Orrville 'Most Wired' Hospital
Posted on Saturday, November 5, 2016 - 9:45am
ORRVILLE -- Aultman Orrville Hospital was recently named as one of three "small and rural hospitals" in Ohio recognized as 2016 "Most Wired" honorees...
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Aultman Orrville 'Most Wired' Hospital

Most wired hospital Aultman Orrville Hospital Orrville Ohio

Posted on Saturday, November 5, 2016 - 9:45am

ORRVILLE -- Aultman Orrville Hospital was recently named as one of three "small and rural hospitals" in Ohio recognized as 2016 "Most Wired" honorees, and one of 24 in Ohio for "all hospitals."

Amy Dalessandro, director of Aultman Corporate Communications, said that according to the results of the 18th Annual Health Care's Most Wired survey released by the American Hospital Association's Health Forum, technology is improving the efficiency of care delivery and creating a new dynamic in patient interactions.

Marchelle Suppan, president and CEO at Aultman Hospital, said, "We are excited to be named one of this year's "Most Wired" small and rural hospitals. This honor serves as recognition for the great work we have seen throughout our five-year integration journey as a member of Aultman Health Foundation."

Suppan noted, "We have made a large investment in implementing new systems and software, as well as upgrading the electrical infrastructure, which provides us the opportunity and resources to continue to serve the community."

Dalessandro said that in terms of redefining the ways they provide care in their communities, Most Wired hospitals are "using technology to build patient engagement with the individual's lifestyle in mind, which includes electronic access to patient information."

She noted that Aultman Orrvllle has "implemented barcode medication scanning, which decreases the chance of errors and ensures patients receive the right medications at the right time. Through the hospital's computerized physician order entry process," Dalessandro continued, " physicians directly enter their orders into the electronic medical record, which decreases the risk of transcription errors."

In addition, Dalessandro noted, Aultman Orrville shares the same electronic medical record as Aultman Hospital's main hospital facilities in Canton, allowing for easier access to the patient's information.

"We recently signed a contract with our electronic health care record vendor to begin consolidating our best of breed software, which will assist with a more seamless movement of data across our continuum," said Liz Getz, Aultman chief information officer, adding, "This will help us share information between the hospital and physician practices to reduce errors and provide our patients with a safer experience through the health care system."

Getz said Aultman Orrville has also implemented a portal which enables patients to view their health information online and share their information with other health care providers and family members in a secure manner.

HealthCare's Most Wired survey was conducted between Jan. 15 and March 15 and is designed to be a leading industry barometer measuring information technology use among hospitals nationwide.

Reporter Paul Locher can be reached at 330-682-2055, or at plocher@the-daily-record.com.

 

Bekaert's 'World of Wire' Expands in Orrville
Posted on Friday, September 23, 2016 - 4:03pm
Bekaert, a corporation with an enviable nearly half-century record in the city's business community, broke ground Tuesday for a new 30,000-square-...
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Bekaert's 'World of Wire' Expands in Orrville

Posted on Friday, September 23, 2016 - 4:03pm

Bekaert, a corporation with an enviable nearly half-century record in the city's business community, broke ground Tuesday for a new 30,000-square-foot addition to its existing 300,000-square-foot plant in the industrial park. The project will mark the seventh expansion since the Belgium-based company moved to the Collins Boulevard site in 1988.

Bekaert is the world leader in the field of shaped wire, and plant manager Otto Simmerman said, "No one in America does this."

The company, which began growing out of the Contours company in 1970, manufactures shaped wire for many products in a large number of fields worldwide.

Simmerman said the plant expansion will, for the first time, allow the company to bring all of its operations under one roof. In addition to the Collins Boulevard site, Bekaert continues to operate a plant at the intersection of Pine and Lake streets, which is where the operation originally began. The Pine Street plant has 18 of Bekaert's 215 Orrville employees.

Kristen Mallardi, human resources manager, said, "We intend to move all our operations ... to one site to house equipment that (is) currently located in our facilities downtown. This will allow us to become more efficient in our operations and eliminate wastes in the supply chain to remain competitive and protect jobs from competition."

Simmerman told a group composed of both city officials and primary company officers who had journeyed from abroad for the occasion, that the new structure will be an "open building" having no pillars or blind spots. In addition, he said it will have an internal loading dock with a high ceiling. This, he said, would enable a semi tractor-trailer to back completely into the plant with the overhead doors shut for loading, with the high ceiling allowing loaders to more efficiently fill an open-top container.

In addition, Simmerman said, the new 150-by-200-square-foot plant will have LED lighting, have effective insulation and utilize new heating sources. He said the investment also will create new lines in which an operator can run multiple work cells without moving to different locations, create an isotropic cleaning center and automated sorting cells.

He said the investment in the building will be $1.65 million.

Simmerman said the company's board approved investing $7 million in the plant this year, of which $5 million has already been spent, much of it for specialty equipment.

"We want to develop new business, so we're investing a lot of money for growth and operational efficiency," said Simmerman.

Simmerman told city leaders, however, that "It is hard to find talent. We've got to get people to move to Wayne County."

He said the company has been hiring all year, but is having difficulty getting technical talent, even though it has been working closely with the Wayne County Schools Career Center and other local educational services."

Mike Hedberg, director of development for Orrville, said, "Bekaert is one of our long-standing industries, which has stood the test of time by making making quality products with great employees. We are excited that Bekaert has chosen to grow here in Orrville. Otto and the team at Bekaert are a big part of the success and growth we are seeing today."

The Bekaert expansion joins a number of other major building projects currently moving forward in Orrville, including major expansions at both the J.M. Smucker Co. and Venture Products, and the construction of the Cobblestone Hotel at the city's northern edge.

Reporter Paul Locher can be reached at 330-682-2055, or at plocher@the-daily-record.com.

Precision Machining Lab New at Wayne County Schools Career Center
Posted on Friday, September 9, 2016 - 2:16pm
New Precision Machining Lab moves into repurposed space   The precision machining lab, adjacent and connected to new construction -- the Robotics...
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Precision Machining Lab New at Wayne County Schools Career Center

Posted on Friday, September 9, 2016 - 2:16pm

New Precision Machining Lab moves into repurposed space

 

The precision machining lab, adjacent and connected to new construction -- the Robotics & Advanced Manufacturing Technology Education Collaborative (RAMTEC) building -- is close to brand-new itself. It took over space previously occupied by construction technologies and was completely renovated over the summer at the Wayne County Schools Career Center.

 

Instructor Bruce Steiner is not only enthusiastic about the additional room the relocated lab enjoys, but about the opportunity the training provides for his students.

 

"Students who come into this lab are No. 1, in high demand and No. 2, will earn above the average wage in northeastern Ohio," Steiner said.

 

A source he documented states the average household wage at $42,000 to $45,000, but students skilled in precision machining may earn more than $58,000 annually,

 

"If you couple it with other skills," he said, such as CAM and CAD, "you can earn a low six-figure income without a college degree in the Cleveland-Akron area."

 

"It's in-demand, high-paying, and it's diverse," Steiner said, meaning it is not tied to just one industry, such as automotive, but also biomedical, aerospace, defense and medical components, for example, a titanium bone screw.

 

"I think that's a strength in Wayne County," Steiner said. "We're not dependent on one segment of industry."

 

Likewise, machine shop skill "applies to any of these."

 

"It's a highly transferrable skill," Steiner said, associated with 50 career fields, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

It has paid benefits, vacation, 401K and paid advanced training.

 

Four female students graduated in the spring. Precision machining is "very much an inclusive trade," said Lynn Moomaw, the Career Center's director of operations and adult education.

 

It takes students who are successful in math and science, Steiner said, but communications skills are also critical.

 

"We also have social studies bringing in labor law, international trade law and OSHA standards," he said. "They're going to use all those skills."

 

"When they find and catch a vision for what this course will do," he said, even those who have struggled or not given full attention to academics are "willing to reinvent themselves / create a new identity."

 

Watching juniors working on an assignment, Moomaw pointed out, "See how they're interacting with each other to get things done."

 

The assignment required collaboration, Steiner said, "to fit the parts to their appropriate machine."

 

Each student gets a chance to act as a foreman, Steiner said, preparing class members for the possible role of manager, a position in which many Career Center alumni serve in local businesses.

 

"This is their opportunity (to develop leadership skills)," he said, adding, "The role of foreman is making sure the whole system runs smoothly."

 

"We want them to be thinking like (business leaders)," understanding profit and loss, Steiner said. "We have to get them thinking about profit as a positive. It's a mindset switch."

 

Steiner explained the "basic gist of a machine shop," in which students first master manual control to within 1//1000 of an inch and then 1//10,000.

 

"They will learn to control that manually / and get instant feedback," he said, before mastering the challenge of CNC when problems that aren't necessarily visible must be solved and they must determine, "Do I change the program to slow it down or speed it up?"

 

Additionally, in most shops they'll still have manual machinery for some jobs, he said.

 

In the new precision machining lab, "We have the room to adapt to what industry needs," Steiner said.

 

One secondary asset to the extra room is "bring(ing) back toolbox rental," Steiner said, making students responsible for an inventory of tools.

 

"Organizational skills are (also) important," he said.

 

Other lab changes over the summer were the relocation and redoing of construction technologies in the space previously housing buildings and grounds, and buildings and grounds to the lab formerly occupied by precision machining.

 

Construction of RAMTEC is ongoing and will be completed to open for adults during the second semester of this school year and for high school seniors in the 2017-18 school year.

 

About three years ago, advanced manufacturing was at the top of the list of areas in which there would be a shortage of employees, Steiner said.

 

"It's coming true," Moomaw said.

 

 

Reporter Linda Hall can be reached at 330-264-1125, Ext. 2230 or lhall@the-daily-record.com. She is @lindahallTDR on Twitter.

 

Maker Monday at Schantz MakerSpace
Posted on Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 2:28pm
Schantz Organ Company hosted its monthly Maker Monday get together on August 29th from 7-9om.    A group of 25 local ‘makers’ were in attendance to...
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Maker Monday at Schantz MakerSpace

Posted on Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 2:28pm

Schantz Organ Company hosted its monthly Maker Monday get together on August 29th from 7-9om.

 

 A group of 25 local ‘makers’ were in attendance to hear Ben Engle talk about his design, and his experiences making his own table top CNC machine.

 

Ben is an engineering student at Akron University. He has an interest in making wooden, electric guitar bodies and parts using CNC technology.This was the original motivator in his efforts to design and build his own machine. He is also frugal, and he wanted to see to what extent he could build a machine for less than $300 in parts.   His experiences have taught him a great deal, and he is now working on a second generation machine.

 

 Our group of makers listened intently to the presentation. Ben did a great job explaining the process he went through, and he brings a lot of enthusiasm for working with this technology. He wants to do more.

 

We are interested in creating a class that will take place over a series of Monday evenings. In the class, each participant will build their own table top CNC machine from a kit of parts. Ben wants to participate in the class, which will be collaborative. Our makers will work together to come up with design improvements and solutions, and the class members will help each other and share ideas as we make these machines. Ben is now completing his second prototype, incorporating his own improvements. He will be bringing that machine to our next Maker Monday meeting, which will be held on Monday Sept 19, 2016 from 7-9 pm at Schantz Organ Company’s assembly room.

 

We will operate the prototype machine and make decisions about what parts to purchase to make up the kit of materials for each class participant. From there we will be determining the class schedule and procedures.

 

Manufacturing Day Events Foster Positive Perceptions of Industry
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 9:39am
As the old idiom goes, “Seeing is believing,’ and that is the guiding principle behind Manufacturing Day.   October 7 marks the fifth annual...
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Manufacturing Day Events Foster Positive Perceptions of Industry

Posted on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 9:39am

As the old idiom goes, “Seeing is believing,’ and that is the guiding principle behind Manufacturing Day.

 

October 7 marks the fifth annual Manufacturing DaySM when thousands of manufacturers will again host students, teachers, parents, job seekers and community leaders at open houses, plant tours and educational sessions to showcase modern manufacturing technology and the cool jobs available. It is a chance for students to see the diverse career options that are innovative, impactful and durable.It was created in response to a dire need in America: The industry today faces a major shortage of skilled workers. An estimated two million manufacturing jobs will go unfilled over the next decade due to companies’ inability to find talent with the required skills. 
 

Several leading industry organizations determined five years ago the best way to combat this malady and reverse negative misperceptions people may have about manufacturing jobs and careers is to literally show “up close and personal” the exciting kind of work that takes place in plants across the U.S.      

 

Participation grows every year. In 2015, more than 2,600 live events were held attended by more than 225,000 students and 55,000 parents, educators, job seekers and other influentials. Impressive numbers, without a doubt. But, did “seeing” actually make these groups “believers”?

 

Data Shows Theory Works

 

Research reveals the theory behind Manufacturing Day works. For the first time, participants were polled about their experience. A new Deloitte perception survey developed in collaboration with The Manufacturing Institute was distributed to the more than 2,500 manufacturing hosts to gather data from attendees. The results are dramatic:

 

81 percent of student respondents are more convinced manufacturing provides careers that are both interesting and rewarding

71 percent of student respondents are more likely to tell friends, family, parents or colleagues about manufacturing

93 percent of educators are more convinced manufacturing provides careers that are interesting and rewarding

90 percent of educators indicated they are more likely to encourage students to pursue a career in manufacturing

 

“These findings significantly reinforce the value of Manufacturing Day,” according to Michelle Drew Rodriguez, manufacturing leader, Center for Industry Insights, at Deloitte. “For those truly exposed to modern day manufacturing, perceptions do change and, based on that, we will move the needle to better fill the skills gap that challenges so many companies today.” Drew Rodriguez explained that as a professional services firm, Deloitte talks to senior level executives every day and for them finding top talent is a top-of-mind, critical issue. It’s one reason why Deloitte has partnered with The Manufacturing Institute for a number of years to help tackle the problem.

 

Skills Gap Studies Offer Insights

One of those joint initiatives is Deloitte’s Skills Gap studies. The current report highlights the impact of the skills gap and offers recommendations on how to help remedy it, which provides further credence to the benefits gained from Manufacturing Day programs.

 

For example, 82 percent of executives responding to the Skills Gap survey indicate they believe the gap will impact their ability to meet customer demand. More than three-quarters (78 percent) believe it will impact their ability to implement new technologies and increase productivity. Large numbers also report the lack of skilled workers hurts the ability to provide effective customer service (cited by 69 percent) and decreases the ability to innovate and develop new products (62 percent).

 

The Skills Gap study also addresses the industry perception problem. Citing the Public Perception of Manufacturing research The Manufacturing Institute and Deloitte conducted over the years, the report notes that “while Americans consider manufacturing among one of the most important domestic industries for maintaining a strong national economy, they rank it low as a career choice for themselves.” The study continues to say, “Moreover, only 37 percent of respondents indicated they would encourage their children to pursue a manufacturing career.”

 

Yet, here’s the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel. According to the report, “Interestingly, those with high industry familiarity tend to have more favorable perceptions, and they are twice as likely (emphasis added) as those with no familiarity to encourage their children to pursue a manufacturing career.” This data aligns with a study done in collaboration with Skills USA, Educational Research of America, and The Manufacturing Institute, which found that 64 percent of students identified personal experiences as having the greatest influence over their career decisions.

 

Engagement is Essential

One conclusion the Public Perception report makes is “manufacturers need to engage people through community, educational and government programs in order to improve the perception of the U.S. manufacturing industry.”

That statement captures the mission of Manufacturing Day. And, as the results of the survey of participants strongly demonstrate, changing perceptions through this initiative has become a tangible measurement.

When we first announced these findings, Carroll Thomas, director of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership, said, “It is powerful to see that our collective efforts are making a difference in educating the public about manufacturing and its rewarding careers, and how manufacturers are connecting with the next generation workforce.”

 

For students participating in Manufacturing Day, seeing really is believing – believing that their futures can be bright with a career in manufacturing.

 

#   #   #

 

About the Author

Jennifer McNelly is Executive Director of The Manufacturing Institute, the non-profit affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). As Executive Director of the Institute, Jennifer is driving an agenda to close the manufacturing skills gap and make manufacturers in America globally competitive. Prior to joining the Institute, Jennifer was a member of the Senior Executive Service (SES) for the U.S. Department of Labor. The Manufacturing Institute is one of the co-producers of Manufacturing Day. Others include the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International; NAM; and National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership. Information on Manufacturing Day 2016 is available at http://www.mfgday.com.)

Jarrett Logistics Systems Routing Center opens in Orrville, Ohio
Jarrett Logistics Routing Center Grand Opening
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2016 - 2:25pm
The new Jarrett Logistics Systems Routing Center is now open for operations!  An exclusive after-hours tour of the 15,000 square foot facility, 1444...
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Jarrett Logistics Routing Center Grand Opening

Jarrett Logistics Systems Routing Center opens in Orrville, Ohio

Posted on Friday, August 12, 2016 - 2:25pm

The new Jarrett Logistics Systems Routing Center is now open for operations! 

An exclusive after-hours tour of the 15,000 square foot facility, 1444 N Main, Orrville was attended by 80 members of the Orrville Area Chamber of Commerce, August 11, in celebration of the Center’s grand opening.

The Chamber appreciated the gracious hospitality shown by owners, Mike and Diane Jarrett, and all of their employees, in hosting this event.

“We are excited to host business guests to our newly renovated space,” commented D Jarrett.  “This project was a transformation of an existing commercial building into a completely updated environment for our Jarrett Logistics Systems Routing Center employees.  The new facility provides us with much needed space for the continued growth.”
 
Extensive renovations were done this past spring to transform the former First National Bank Operations Center, into a fantastic, ultra-modern new work space.  The new facility will house sales & marketing staff, the logistics operations and Jarrett Truckload Services. 

Fifty employees have already relocated to the new building which has the capacity to accommodate more than 100.

Jarrett Logistics Systems, Inc., (JLS) is a third party logistics company that specializes in transportation management services for manufacturing companies, wholesalers and distributors who ship or receive products from all over the world.

Founded in 1999, Jarrett Companies is one of the fastest growing businesses in NE Ohio and was recognized by the Cleveland Plain Dealer as one of the Top Places to Work in northeast Ohio (June 2016). 

Interested in employment?  Visit jarrettlogistics.com/careers for information on available positions.

The Orrville Area Chamber of Commerce is the foremost voice for the business community in Orrville and eastern Wayne County, Ohio.  The Orrville Area Chamber has been "opening doors" for her members since 1915 and we continue to actively engage our members and community to be the dynamic force for community progress.

Members are invited to Breakfast Before Business at Orrville High School on September 16 to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Heartland Education Community and to kick off Character Education Week.  Contact the Chamber’s Membership and Marketing Coordinator, Jen Epling, 330-682-8881 to register.

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